Obesity, or having a BMI greater than 30, is becoming a more common health problem over the last few decades with about 40% of adults now dealing with this.  It is also a health problem that is stigmatized and the patient is frequently blamed for.  Everyone knows that if they just ate less and moved more they wouldn’t have this problem. Right? People are stereotyped as lazy and not watching what they eat.  Research shows that there are other things that contribute to patients having problems controlling their weight, besides eating too much. In fact it is common for obese people to eat fewer calories than their thinner friends, Dr. Jason Fung is a kidney doctor who believes that obesity is primarily a hormonal disorder, and not a caloric disorder.

Dr. Fung is the author of several books that have been talked about recently – including the “Obesity Code” and “the Complete Guide to Fasting” and most recently “the Diabetes Code”.  He has a program called Intensive Dietary Management which is available online to provide further support to people who are interested.

Insulin Resistance and increased insulin levels are what Dr. Fung believes has contributed to our obesity epidemic and what makes it harder for people to lose weight the longer they have been obese.

Hormones are molecules that move throughout the body and deliver messages to the target cell.  One of the main hormones involved in obesity is insulin.  Insulin is made in the pancreas and helps the body use energy and store excess energy for a time when it can be used – and thus causes weight gain.  If you decrease the amount of insulin you are exposed to, you can decrease the weight,

How can you decrease insulin levels?

Insulin levels are decreased by

  1. eating foods that don’t raise insulin as much – carbohydrates raising the insulin levels more than proteins or fats.
  2. decreasing levels of the hormone cortisol that increases in response to stress and
  3. decreasing insulin resistance 
  4. decreasing how often you eat. 

How can you treat obesity and reverse diabetes?

So to reverse this epidemic it may help to:

  1. reduce added sugar consumption.  Read labels.
  2. eat whole unprocessed foods.
  3. avoid refined grains like white flour to decrease insulin spikes.
  4. increase consumption of natural fats – healthy fats like avocados, walnuts, virgin olive oil, fatty fish – helps with feeling full by stimulating the fullness hormones peptide yy and cholecystokinin – and fats don’t raise insulin levels as much.
  5. improve stress control and sleep hygiene to decrease the stress hormone cortisol from stimulating insulin.  Try Tai Chi, yoga, meditation, massage and regular exercise to help with this.
  6. increase physical activity to improve insulin sensitivity of tissues.
  7. limit the bodies exposure to insulin by decreasing the frequency of meals. Insulin is released each time we eat so decreasing how frequently we eat decreases how often we are exposed. If cells aren’t as frequently exposed to insulin, then they will be come more sensitive to its effects and less will be produced. And decreased insulin helps with weight loss. 
  8. don’t drink diet soda or artificially sweetened things that increase insulin release even though they don’t contain calories.
  9. increase fiber – to help with digestion and decrease production of the hunger hormone ghrelin.

Dr. Fung recommends people consult with their physician to see if intermittent fasting is appropriate for them and to do lab work in order to monitor their treatment progress.  There are different protocols that people follow when fasting and it can be used with many different diets – although many people chose to pair it with a Keto diet to decrease exposure to foods that increase insulin levels. 

 

***Note *** This post, like all my other posts, is for general medical information only and is not to be taken as direct advice.  Please consult your personal physician for more information.

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